On showing up.

They say half the battle is showing up. I would say 90% of the battle is showing up. Today, everyone wants to be successful, but they don’t want to put in the work to be successful.

Everyone wants to be a photographer. They will go out and buy a camera and take a few pictures. But, when they find out photography is more than just taking pictures and that it requires deliberate practice to develop an eye for the art of picture taking… well, you don’t see them carrying the camera around anymore.

Everyone wants to be a writer. They will go out and buy a domain, build a website and rattle off a few blogs. But when they find out writing is more than just throwing words on paper and that it requires the discipline to pick up the pen every day to become decent… well, you don’t see any more blog posts out of them.

Everyone wants to be an entrepreneur. They will boast to the world about how grand their business idea is and dream about how much money they are going to make. But when they find out building a business is more than just talk and that it requires an extraordinary amount of discomfort, rejection and loneliness… well, you don’t see them talking much about entrepreneurship anymore.

The vast majority of people are quitters. This is unfortunate for them, but an opportunity to anyone willing to show up every day and put in the work.

Let’s say your dream is to become a professional photographer, but you never give it a shot (pun intended) because you are intimidated by the competition…

If 100,000 people want to become a professional photographer tomorrow, 25,000 of them will drop out after seeing how expensive a camera is.

Out of the 75,000 people who buy a camera, another 25,000 people will call it quits after discovering how difficult it is to operate a camera.

Out of the 50,000 people who stuck around and took the time to learn the camera and put in the practice, another 25,000 of them will leave the race after receiving their first bit of criticism.

This means after the first year, if you showed up every day to become a better photographer, you have already beat out 75% of the competition.

And by year three, there will only be 1,000 of the original 100,000 wannabe photographers left that can actually call themselves professional photographers.

In other words, if you want to become a professional photographer, show up every day for three years –– if you do this there is a good chance you will find some level of success.

But here is the problem, people don’t want to show up.

They want the applause. They want the Instagram likes. They want the notoriety. But, the last thing they want to do is show up…. the last thing in the world they want to do is show up and put in the work.

I am not writing this post to put anyone down, I am just addressing the reality of the world we live in today.

We have access to thousands of opportunities at our fingertips, and because of this, "stickability" is non-existent… as soon as people begin to feel the smallest amount of pushback in a particular direction, they pull out their phones and look for an easier route.

Relationship not going well? Hop on Tinder.

Taxi taking a little too long? Call an Uber.

Don’t want to wait in line at Starbucks? Order from the app.

Today, we live in a world where innovation and the progression of technology are removing something fundamental to personal growth and development — adversity.

We have grown so accustomed to living lives free of adversity, that when we inevitably experience it in our journey towards success, we quit.

Here's the deal folks, they don’t make an app for success, there is no easy route.

You have to show up every single day and give it all you got, and if you do, you will be 90% of the way there. 

By Cole Schafer


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